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chu of "washington journal." in a few moments on the communicators from a look at how hurricane sandy effective emergency communications. in 40 minutes, it chief justice john roberts on the supreme court and constitutional law. and while looking at china's political and economic and military power, and another on the situation in syria. >> one of the major effects on hurricane sandy was on telecommunications. that is our topic today on "the communicators." christopher guttman-mccabe is our guest today. mr. christopher guttman-mccabe, overall, what was the effect of hurricane sandy on your organization, verizon, sprint, at&t and etc. >> guest: thank you. i wouldn't mind taking a step back and providing a little perspective on this storm and the impact it had. mayor bloomberg said that the damage was unprecedented. but it may be the worst storm that the city has ever faced. and the previous title search, it was 14 feet. governor chris christie said the damage was unthinkable. we have buyers. we had hurricane force winds. we had massive flooding and if you look at that in the flooding of
less vulnerable. sandy was a devastating storm. many lives were lost as a result of the storm bond seven in my state of maryland. eight billion people on the east coast of the united states at some time were without power at the results of sandy. maryland fare much better than our surrounding states. we sent a lot of our resources to help our friends in new york and new jersey and other states that were impacted, but it was the severe storm for the people in maryland. the high sustained winds were unprecedented in our state. 70 mile an hour winds, hour upon hour upon hour, doing incredible damage to our state. heavy rains. we had record number amount of rains, nine inches in the coastal area. that caused extreme coastal flooding, storm surges worked severe, waves were as high as seven feet. i want to talk specifically about the 2 regions of our state in which people are still trying to recover from the severity of the storm. one is western maryland. we were experiencing nine inches of rain on the east coast of maryland, western part of our state had this blizzard that occurred that
hurricane sandy affected communications and what it revealed about telecommunication systems during emergencies. then vice president and others are in attendance at a pentagon announcement of a new navy submarine called the uss delaware. and later the senate returns at 2 p.m. eastern from its thanksgiving recess with a possible vote on the sportsmen's bill. that would allow for more recreational hunting, fishing and other outdoor activities in national parks. >> host: well, one of the major effects of hurricane sandy was on telecommunications, and that's our topic this week on "the communicators." christopher guttman-mccabe is the vice president of ctia, the wireless association. they represent all the wireless companies. mr. guttman-mccabe, overall what was the effect of sandy on your member organizations, the verizons, the at&ts, sprints, etc. >> guest: sure, peter, and thanks for having me back. if you don't mind, i wouldn't mind taking a half step back and providing perspective on this storm and ultimately the impact that it had. if you listen to mayor bloomberg who said that th
to maintain phone service for people in the affected areas of sandy. >> guest: thank you to the both both of you for allowing me to be there for you today. my condolences go out to the families. there are many loved ones lost in this tragic event. my condolences go out to them, and of course, my hats off to those brave people who continue to answer the call. in terms of the engagement, as you know, the german literally spent the night at the agency. our public safety% of the same. we are definitely engaged in the process that we have been working firsthand went as far as the month goes to make an assessment in terms of those initial numbers. up to 25% of those were disabled during this process. what the fcc does is work with these entities to assess the situation on the ground and to use this information to see what we can do better going forward. so yes, some of those legacy is, we have been talking about payphones in a long time. and that just reinforces this in terms of communications engagement. it is the all of the above approach. very few things are not vulnerable. there are a lot o
, if we could start with events of the week. >> guest: yes. >> host: hurricane sandy. >> guest: yes. >> host: um, what is your assessment? there have been reports that up to 25% of cell towers in the northeast have been knocked out, that people are now using pay phones because their service is not working. what is your assessment of the carriers and their ability to maintain phone service for people in these affected areas? >> guest: peter, first of all, allow me to thank you, the both of you, for allowing me to be here today. um, also, my condolences, of course, go out to the families. there are many loved ones who were lost in this, in this tragic event, so my condolences go out to them, and, of course, hats off to those brave first responders who answered, continue to answer the call. in terms of the fcc' engagement as you know, the chairman literally spent the night at the agency. public safety person did the same. and we are definitely engaged in the process, have been working firsthand with fema to make an overall assessment. you're right in terms of those initial numbers, tha
despite the logistic difficult created by hurricane sandy. the biggest challenge. >> there was no challenge coming in from denver 68 and sunny. [laughter] it's been like that for the last couple of weeks. i don't know what the fuss is. [laughter] no, let me say what a pleasure it is to back hire and thank you so much for putting this together. as i'm looking out in the audience here, i see a lot of people i worked with during the days, and, you know, as we talk about the sort of onerous and times odious job of assistant secretary, one thing that made it a lot of better, you had extremely talented people to work with, and those are people that made the job easier and in fact made the job enjoyable at times. the other thing that makes the job easier is that i think our president has secretary of state have taken the position very seriously and put good anemia it. when you become the assistant secretary chances are pretty good that you're you have a good predecessor there. i had jim kelly who had done a lot of work to set things up. and to get through a very tough ti
in this election, certainly the convention in tampa and then sandy. it's easy to measure the impact but among the voters that decided last night and in the last seven days barack obama actually won a majority which is a huge surprise to political scientists around the country who will tell you when you have an incumbent challenger the challenger picks up the majority of the last voters and the so-called undecided voters. in this case they broke for the incumbent and sandy probably had something to do with that. so i think it is a matter of policy. it's a matter of outreach that includes people speaking for the republican party and a matter of tone making people feel that this is not just an inclusive party, these policies are inclusive and the way to create more jobs and never can be for everybody is to have the policies that were enunciated in the plan that met on the lead out and we were not successful getting it to that level. >> do you think the comments by the senatorial candidates todd akin and richard more mattered in the polling that use all for the republicans brought the? >> yes. ag
presentation. wondered how hurricane sandy and the possible need for fema to get emergency supplemental aid will impact on the lame-duck and if you could talk a little bit about that and if you think the cr that goes through march now will be voted into that to be finished out for the year. >> let me talk about that because i wasn't appropriator. the preparation process is not only broken down, it's jut down. as a consequence, all of the recent decisions are made with respect to the cr. the cr ultimately is written to the leader's office. so those decisions will not be made in the lame-duck by majorities on either side. it will be made by harry reid on the senate side and neither agreed to or acquiesced in by john boehner on the house side. it's the worst rate in appropriate is to put it on the hands of one man, two men in this case. i can't give you any guidance on that. talk to john boehner and see what he agreed to. there would be no logical appropriations process with respect to these issues. >> banks. i was wondering who would be among the first of the cabinet secretaries that will be
the national flood insurance program and how the insurance companies are responding to sandy with an industry representative. this is a half-hour. postcode let me introduce you to john prible, vice president of the independent insurance agents and brokers of america. our topic is the national insurance program. mr. purple, this article was in "the wall street journal" yesterday ensures market bubble tab. what's the responsibility when it comes to recovering from sandy? >> guest: sure, that article and a hand like really captures exactly what is going on. so when a typical insurance event for a hurricane, there's going to be damage caused by wind, wind storm damage, fallen trees. you see in the news media there's going to be fires or natural gas lines. all of this damage will be covered are your typical homeowner's insurance policy that is covered by the private insurance, so you're going to contact if you have a claim camile contact your insurance company. they're going to cover it with your limits and deductibles and it's going to be private policy. any damage caused by flooding is covered o
announced they're going to hold field hearings on sandy and telecommunications. >> guest: yes. and i think the public notice that they issued struck the right tone and asked all the right questions. it is an opportunity to take a look at our world which has a bunch of different networks in many of these locations. we also have to remember that in a lot of rural areas you have one network -- not four or five different networks -- but there are a lot of different opportunities here. there's a lot of good work that's been going on, but at the same time there's also a lot of liability and concern. there's a lot of people's lives literally dependent on this now. this isn't a luxury anymore. and particularly with shifting all of our emergency response stuff over from television and radio, we're now including texting in that and internet messages. and if we're going to build our future on these really powerful networks that are capable of doing so much more than the old networks, we have to acknowledge that, you know, time has come to have some basic principles in place, some basic safeguards so
sandy for the government, private industry, the military, media, and education. in addition, this fall, we welcome one of the largest and most academically accomplished classes in our history after receiving a record 123,000 total applications for admission. these successes dwieb who we are and where we are going. we need to support those students and faculty members because they depend on us. our alumni and people of the commonwealth of pennsylvania depend on us for educational opportunities, economic development, and competitiveness, and our nation depends on us for ground breaking research and training for the next generation of leaders, scientists, thinkers, and teachers. allow me to put a few faces on the penn state community. will cat powers and will martin stand? cat and will, student leaders working to fight pediatric cancer through the largest student-run philanthropy in the world. since 1977, they raised more than $89 million for the four diamonds fund at the hershey medical center. we brought dvds of the documentary, with "why we dancer all of you. pick up a copy on the way
government is going to do, like roads and bridges, and now we're in the middle after hurricane sandy like fema. and i think dean is a very interesting question that befuddles me because it started with jimmy carter, one of jimmy carter's, numbered bureaucratic innovations was fema. and reagan did was take it scarce and did we take it certificate didn't staff it with professional. then in 92 bush senior got burned with a response to hurricane andrew in florida. and clinton wrote in his autobiography, i made a mental note at the time, i'm not going to get elected because of my disaster management record but i could sure lose this job i'll make darshan going to hire a pro that will really with fema into shape, which he did. and then bush junior comes in the. he has a government agency after eight years, which everybody likes. no one is mad at fema in 2000. and then bush, for nobody is reason to me, besides forget it, let's start privatizing functions again. let's put and political cronies again. let's go back to the old way. and he got burned. and so obama comes back and put in a pro. people
announced there's field hearings on sandy and telecommunications. >> guest: yes. i think the public notice issued struck the right tone and asked all the right questions. it is an opportunity to take a look at our world which has networks in many locations. we have to remember that in a lot of rural areas, you have one network, not four or five networks. there's a whrot of opportunities here. there's a lot of good work going on, but at the same time, there's also a lot of liability and concern rm -- concern. a lot of people's lives are dependent on this. this is not a luxury anymore, and, particularly, we're shifting emergency response stuff over from television and radio. we're now including texting in that and internet messages and if we're going to build a future on powerful networks that are capable of doing so much more than the old networks, we have to acknowledge that, you know, the time has come to have some basic principles in place, some basic safeguards so that when the prices hit, people know what to do and they are able to do it. >> host: herald feld, this is "the communicator
in this campaign was the super storm sandy not only suspending the campaign immediate coverage for generating the endorsement -- bloomberg endorsement and on the other hand the republican party over the years, we have seen looking over the right shoulder and tear in tehran the primaries like bob english or my castle or dick lugar and a few of knowledge climate is real work across the aisle but this may not have registered yet. yesterday for the five members of congress republicans targeted went down in defeat. one of them dan benishek is still in the bubble and may or may not carry through but four out of five went down because they were targeted for taking taking the antiscience position. i'm wondering to questions 14 whit. and for stan is there an opening for the president -- my present to go more locally on climate than he did the first time? >> is sandy a turning point in this discussion are not? >> the whole discussion of climate change has become so polarized that i think if we can address some of our economic challenges and if we can address some of our immigration challenges, there ar
about sandy and all that, but there's no question -- and i'm certainly a global warming worrier and one who -- >> do you believe it's happening? >> well, i don't know how you can't. >> >> just asking, just asking. [applause] >> sandy is, like, okay, fine, we had that. but there's every other piece of evidence is just so overwhelming, you know? you and i were talking at lunch about how you have to look at the numbers and take the numbers as numbers, and these are numbers. whether it's temperatures, sea levels or any of that stuff. so you can't not believe it. but i do think -- [laughter] i don't think hardly anybody believes that we're not having global warming, right? is there anybody? >> a few. there are a few people who still say that. >> but, look, i do think everything -- these are balances, right? we can have a zero tolerance policy on any damage, and we'll have in economy and no jobs, just sort of let everybody run wild, and we'll all be underwater and unable to priest or something -- unable to breathe, and i think right now we're at a pretty good balance in terms of people's awar
the program being overhauled as a result of what happened because of sandy? >> okay. in reference to your first question, i don't think, you know, it's a day after the election. i don't, you know, what is going to happen with the dscc. first you'd have to ask people, including senator gillibrand, whether she'd want it, and i haven'ted talked to her about it yet. we talked about elections and congratulations, and she did a great job in the senate in the first six years, first two years and will do a great job in the next six years. she's a great partner to have, and i'm glad she won an overwhelming victory and proud of the victory that she won. in terms of flood insurance, obviously, you know, we have huge damage in new york. it is incredible. um, i flew by helicopter the first day with the mayor and a little later, next day with the governor. and you saw how broad the damage was, you know, it wasn't just one community or two communities, but just spread out all over a huge area, huge metropolitan area. and then for the four days after that or five or six spent time on the ground, and you
to the areas affected by hurricane sandy. a 45 minute speech at a cybersecurity summit she also said she hoped the senate would consider cybersecurity legislation after the election. >> it's a perfect morning to talk about scary things, scary things with unpleasant names like mel where and computer worms and trojan horses and even little messages when you get in your in box because you're nothing but headaches and loss. if you don't like the idea of people snooping around your in box or personal e-mail. you care about a company that stirs up electronically and worries about competitive theft over the internet and a few flaws and recently to the director of the cia painted a dire picture of day-to-day cybercrime and the foreign enemies if we don't show ourselves up can inflict enormous damage to the power grid water system and critical infrastructure. we would worry about plans and bombs and not worry about good intentions and acting skills. people care and increasingly so and so this morning "the washington post" has convened a stellar group of cyber experts to highlight the issue. the vulnera
hurricane sandy, the superstorm, has done to states, so many states, destroying lives and property and leaving people without power for days on end. well, multiply that many times, mr. president, if it were a deliberate cyber attack that knocked out the electric grid along the entire east coast. that's what we're talking about. that is the kind of risk that calls us to act. we have heard from the experts over and over again that this vulnerability is huge and escalating. we know that the number of cyber attacks that have been reported to the department of homeland security has increased by 200% in just the last year. and those are just the -- the attacks that have been reported. that's just the tip of the iceberg. undoubtedly, there are many more on our critical infrastructure that have not been reported. we know that there have been attempts to probe the security of the computer systems that run some of our natural gas pipelines. this problem is very real and it is not only a threat to our national and homeland security, it is also a threat to the economic prosperity of this count
. as a matter of fact due to hurricane sandy we have a website and working with partners to raise funds to purchase to replacements in the new jersey area. >> have you moved into the world of the e-book get? >> not yet. we have been exploring and do not discourage it. may schools and children research most have not had access to the piece of equipment and sell we have been lucky at how can we provoke that? because frankly in addition to wanting children to have books in being gauge read know it is a great way to do that for many children. i a note he does not want to look back in 10 years. we want to make sure that children were starving to have the opportunity to learn how to use the e-book and what it can mean to them. we know our friends at first book working on that and i cannot think maybe in a year or two we will do that project together. >> we are working on a digital platform so we can breathe up the limitations. if anyone is confused if there is a divide, i will reassure there is a terrible gap in the country. 32%, not a misstatement, 42% are from low-income families. they sim
right now in response to hurricane sandy's adevastation we have a website up and we're working with partners to raise funds to purchase replacements for library in the new jersey and new york area. >> carol, have you moved -- in to the e-book world at all? >> not in a big way yet. we have certainly been exploring it and we don't discourage it. many of the schools and children we serve most have not had access to the the piece of equipment and so we have been looking at how can we promote that? very frankly in addition to wanting children to have books and get them engaged. we know the e book is a great way to do that. i don't want to look back ten years from now and say oh my goodness we let another digital divide occur. we want to make sure that the children we're serving have the opportunity to learn how to use the e-book and what it's there and what it can mean to them. we know our friends at first book are working on that kind of thing. i can't help but think in another year or two, that will probably be a project we're doing together. >> jane you are working on e-books? >>
storm sandy on telecoms indicators. on "the communicators."
of the egyptian desert which is to say sandy, flat, rocky, bleak. you can't imagine why this point would be the place where two armies, you know, sort of came to a halt and dug in. but the reason is because it couldn't be outflanked. it was blocked on the north by the mediterranean sea. on the south there's kind of a marshy, sandy area called the qatar depression which can't really be -- it's impossible to heavy vehicles such as tanks, for instance. rommel likes -- one of rommel's tricks when he was fighting was to skirt around to posing army and jump on him from behind. so that couldn't happen here. among them were my five soldiers. and when they got to egypt in ir the first time in more than a year, they were separated in two groups. jack brister and dirke joined the first battalion king's royal rifle corps and went down with the seventh armored division which was the storied desert rats. they were a very famous part of the british army. cox, bolte and hayward cutting were sent out with the second battalion. so between those two groups they pretty much saw most of the battle when it fi
, but it is not an outdated one and we have all been reminded of that of late. in the wake of hurricane sandy, many of us face days without power and what our laptops in their ipads in our e-readers ran out of battery light, we turned to books. reading them by candlelight. [applause] no matter how clever, convenient or cutting-edge digital media becomes in the future, books will remain and will always be a part of the conversation at "the new york times." we know there would not be a times book review without all of you, the editors and publishers and writers who devote their time to creating books, bringing them to readers. so i would like to thank all of you again for continuing to tell your story, so that we can tell hours. thank you. [applause] >> in now, to present the medal for distinguished contribution to american literature is barton amis. martyn amis is the author of 13 novels, including the rachel papers, money, london fields, the pregnant widow and most recently, lionel as though. he is the author of experience, two collections of short stories in six books of nonfiction is including the second th
sandy's devastation, we've got a web site up and we are working with partners to raise funds to purchase terrific replacements for libraries and the new york and new jersey area. >> have you moved into the ebook world at all? >> not in a big way, yet. we are encouraging it and do not discourage it. children have not had access to the piece of equipment, so we have been looking at how can we promote that because frankly in addition to wanting children to have books and get them engaged and the book is a great way to do that for many children, i do not want to look back ten years from now and say my goodness we let another digital divide occur. we want to make sure that the children we are serving have the opportunity to learn how to use the book and what it is and what it can mean to them. we know that our friends at facebook are working on that kind of thing and i can't help but think in another year or two that will probably be a project that we are doing together. >> you are working on the books? >> we are working on a digital platform so that we can work the boundaries of all kinds of
that it was sandy and flat and rocky. you cannot imagine why this would be the point where the two armies came to a halt. the reason is it was blocked on the north by the mediterranean sea. on the south, there was kind of a marsh area which it is impossible for heavy vehicles, such as tanks, one of his tricks when he was fighting was to go around the opposing army and jump on them from behind. so that cannot happen here. the english were pouring material into the spot, getting ready to fight. when they got to egypt for the first time in more than a year, they were separated into two groups. they went down to the southern end of the line and they were very famous, it was a famous part of the british army. they sent off for the second battalion and went to the north end of the wind. line. between the two groups, they pretty much saw most of the battle and it finally came on october 23. now, i'm going to do a little discretion since we are hearing about hurricanes, to redo something that i wrote about my uncle's trip from his training battalion in egypt to the frontline. what i've tried to do thr
of a sandy area which is impossible for heavy vehicles such as tanks for instance. one of rommel's track's when he was around the opposing army was to jump on them from behind but that couldn't happen here. they were pouring material into the spot on the egyptian desert when he decided to fight, and then when they got to egypt for the first time the were separated into two groups. jack brister joined the first battalion and went down to the southern end of the line with the armored division which was the story of the desert, the very famous part of the british army. they were sent off with the second battalion and went up to the north end of the line so between them, between the two groups they pretty much saw most of the battle when it finally came october 23rd. i'm going to take a little digression since we are in vermont and we are hearing that hurricanes to read to read you something i wrote about my uncle's trip from his training from the front line it's really what i try to do as i thought about this is kind of trying to get inside of his mind as he drives across the egyptian deser
of conservative agitator the with sandy e-mails making fun of stanford for being antisecond amendment and produced a firestorm on the list people were quoting the opinions from the 19th century that we've never heard of. i talked about my friends that had been killed working with of the city high school kids and other people talk about their experiences with friends who had been killed and there was a personal deep discussion that we never would have had if not for that provocation and still at the end didn't we just see what's happening when we were talking about things we wouldn't have talked about other wisecracks free speech has a moral high ground. someone who claims that, you know, like i'm on the side of niceness and so devotee. they are on the side of their own power to tell you to say. they will never see that to them. >> i am john peterson to reply to the american university. >> my undergraduate all modern. >> like a lot of the private colleges it has restricted speech codes. and i know that you have talked a lot about the whole guarantee but there are a lot fewer tools that's harder to
needs in this nation. >> host: do you foresee a hearing on sandy and its affect? >> guest: i anticipate -- i'm not sure if it would be necessarily at the federal level. but i know in terms of this -- i'm pretty confident that there will be some assessment. normally on a state-by-state level. again, looking at and evaluating and making pronouncements is what we can do better. there will be hearings. i'm not sure if it will escalate to the federal level. >> host: thank you, mignon cyburn and paul kirby. this is the tremont on c-span2. "communicators" on c-span2. .. >> on the aid of the 2012 election former u.s. representatives talked about competitive u.s. house and senate races around the country. panels includes former representative former chairs of the republican, democratic national committees. from the bipartisan policy center in washington, this is an hour and 20 minutes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> why don't we go ahead and begin. good morning everybody. i and a senior fellow at the bipartisan policy center and more relevant a former member of congress f
and washington is because of sandy. we had studio issuescome the sore little patch together for this "in depth" with kenneth davis. your most recent "don't know much about the american presidents" is about the american president and you talk about a couple elections. i went to took about 1800 the election of james k. polk versus henry clay. you compare those talking about how vicious they were. is today's election, the current fund we are red, vicious compared to the ones we just talked about? >> guest: no, it's probably more general and person if you look at some of the things said. for instance, going back further to 1796, the first contested election when john adams in thomas jefferson, that the teacher is 20 years earlier, who had combined to really bring the declaration of independence into being were now fierce political rivals. they had maintained a friendship of sorts as jefferson served as vice president, with the result affiliate presidents and vice presidents elected back then, something that changed soon after. jefferson and adams had begun to form what were the beginnings of the t
to hurricane sandy. this will come as courtesy of local coverage on c-span2. moderating tonight's debate is shana mosque. >> good evening and welcome. for the next hours, you will hear from the candidates that want to represent maine. they are independent danny dalton, senator cynthia dill, independent transport and finally steve woods it is also an independent. this debate is a partnership between aarp and the university of southern maine. i want to give you a quick word about the format tonight. a diverse mix of several different sources, including our editorial board as well as viewers. we want this debate to be truly interactive. we want to hear from you. paul is standing by moderating our facebook and twitter. >> we have good questions. this is a good chance to ask the candidates anything you want. you can go onto our website and take part in our discussion and we will ask the best questions during the next hour. the candidates will have one minute to ask the questions. with so many candidates, the coin toss is simply out of the question so we will be going in alphabetical order and
, sandy, rocky, flat. you can't imagine why the point would be the place where two are mays came to a halt. the reason because it congress be -- it was blocked on the north by the mediterranean sea, on the south there's a marshy area. it can't be impossible to have heave vehicles such as tanks, for instance. rommel, one of rommel's tricks when he was fighting was to skirt around the opposing army and jump ton from behind. that couldn't happen it here. the english were pouring material and men in to the spot in the egyptian dessert getting ready to fight. among them were my five soldiers. when they got to egypt for the first time in more than a year, they were separated in to two groups. jack and -- they joined the first bay battalion and went con to the other end of the line which was a story dessert rats, they were famous part of the british army. they were sent off with the second bay tollon. they went off to the north end of the line. wean the two groups they pretty much saw most of the battle when it finally came. october 23rd. i'm going take a little digression since we're in vermont
to hurricane sandy's devastation we've got a web site up, and we're working with partners to, um, raise funds to purchase terrific replacements for libraries in the new york and new jersey area. >> host: carol rasco, have you moved into the e-book world at all? >> guest: well, not in a big way yet. but we have certainly been exploring it, and we don't discourage it. many of the schools and children we serve most have not had access to the, you know, the piece of equipment. and so we have been looking at how can we promote that, because very frankly, in addition to wanting children to have books and get them engaged -- and we know that the e-book is great way to do that for many children -- i above all do not want to look back ten years from now and say, oh, my goodness, we let another digital divide occur. we want to make sure that the children we're serving have the opportunity to learn how to use the e-book and what is there and what it can mean to them. so we know our friends at first book are working on that kind of thing, and i can't help but think in another year or two that'll probably
to supply libraries with books. as a matter of fact, right now, in response to hurricane sandy and the devastation there, we have a website up and we are working with partners to purchase replacements for libraries in the new york and new jersey area. >> carol hampton rasco, have you moved into the e-book world at all? >> we have started exploring it, and we do not discourage it. many of the schools and children we serve have not had access to the piece of equipment. so we have been looking at how can we promote that. because in addition to wanting children to have books and get them engaged in reading, we know that the e-book is a great way to do that. i certainly don't want to look back 10 years from now and say, oh, my goodness, we have another digital divide that occurred. we want to make sure that the children we are serving have the opportunity to learn how to use the book and what it is there and what it can mean to them. we are now working on that kind of thing and that will probably be a project that would bring together. >> jane robinson, are you working on e-books? >
talked to him. anyway, i'm glad to be here. sandy did not keep me awake at and to with colleagues with whom i've shared many professional and personal experiences. [inaudible] a quick note on the role of assistant secretary of state, i don't know how my colleagues feel, but of all the jobs i've had i thought that was the most demanding in the most challenging. the most dramatic was being with henry kissinger on a lot of escapades. the most fun with him ambassador to but the most grueling i believe was assistant secretary. i have both a macro and micro example of challenges, but with time i will say that china road goes was a macro challenge. we can come back to that because that was quite a challenge during my time in office. the macro one is really shared by all of us. that is to get the attention of this region that it deserves. now, every regional assistant secretary tries to do that from a parochial standpoint. in our case at least in the last two decades, the fact it's so important that it was virtually true. so it wasn't just parochial. i'm going to be going when we talk abo
these problems. you saw what we did with hurricane sandy. we can do this wit with a hurrie of the debt of the fiscal cliff coming. if only we can get it up to a vote in the house. that may not happen. and it may be that they came not we should deal on this plan because there's no plain error so easy procedural way to get a vote against the a few months down the road that should actually meet those targets. and, frankly, find a tax form plan that raises the trillion dollars in revenues is a far tricky than the 1986 tax reform which cut rates, broaden the base and eliminate deductions but was revenue neutral. that was tough enough. but if they can manage to find that, we may see that dynamic emerge. i will make just two other quick point. one is very interesting role the paul ryan will play from this point on. paul ryan was simultaneously a loser and a winner on tuesday night. a winner because he won his house seat, a loser for the obvious reason but also for a couple of additional ones. it's kind of embarrassing when you put on the ticket and you can't carry your own state. but also his
did with hurricane sandy. we can do this with the hurricane and the debt in the fiscal cliff coming if only we can get it up to a vote in the house. now that may not happen and maybe they cannot reach a deal on this plan because there is no plan and no easy procedural way to get a vote that would guarantee a few months down the road that you would actually meet those targets and frankly finding a tax reform plan that raises the trillion dollars in revenues is far trickier than the 1986 tax reform which cut rates, eliminate deductions that was revenue-neutral. that was tough enough but if they can manage to do that we may see that dynamic emerged. i will make two other quick points. one is a very interesting role the paul ryan will play from this point on. paul ryan was simultaneously a loser and a winner on tuesday night. a winner because he won his house seat, a loser for the obvious reason but also for a couple of good additional ones. it's kind of embarrassing when you're put on a ticket and you cannot carry your own state and also his percentage in his own district went down sig
, loaded with them. >> yeah. not many people watched it. i mean to be honest, some say the storm, and sandy may have had an impact, i don't know that it's -- voters who decided in the last seven days, barack obama won a majority. which was a huge surprise to political scientists around the country who will tell you where you have an incumbent and challenger, the challenger picks up the majority of the last minute voters and so-called undecided voters because they are not happy with the status quo, but wait until the end to decide. in this case, they broke for the incumbent, and sandy probably had something to do with that, but, look, i think it's a matter of policy. it's a matter of outreach because people speak for the republican party, and timely, it's a matter of tone. in, again, making people feel that this is not just an exclusive party, but the policies are inclusive, and we were just not getting it to that level. >> do you think the comments by the senator candidates akin, and did that affect polling you saw for republicans broadly? >> yes. [laughter] >> the final numbers, i think, a
. in the wake of hurricane sandy, governor chris christie of new asked for help with gas pipeline crews. there are people from specter energy here today. specter has crews in ontario that were ready to go. there was some pickup in some pipeline. i get an urgent call from our board members. he said -- this is crazy. we got into it. several people worked on it. they found out -- we could not -- it got resolved. the crews helped the electricity workers. we got to this crisis. it underscores the importance of the on the border work. now that we have got the u.s. elections behind us, is there a moment to build an amendment on it now? why is it so important to you? >> it is of immense benefit to both sides. we remain each other's largest trading partners. we are the two most integrated economies in the world. to have businesses constantly coming up against silly differences or the tyranny of small differences makes no sense. we have been making good progress since we agreed to this one year ago. it has been moving ahead well. it will pick up some steam now that the election is over. i hope th
pallone of new jersey where he talks about thel situation with hurricane sandy in his state. >> another new jerseyersey. congressmen this is congressman frank pallone. congressman, thanks for joining us as you go ahead with your recovery efforts there and new jersey our last caller brought up some concern about being able to vote on tuesday after the damage frot the storm.aller brout up a is that going to be a problem ia blljersey? >> guest: wellguest: it may be n the sense of people being able to access a polling place. now, every authority whether it is the governor or the county clerk's -- they assured us that there will be places to vote. but if we have places to vote that are significantly distant from where people traditionally do vote, or where there is an access problem -- that does pose a problem. we have to make sure that there is a polling place that is operational, and in a reasonable location for people to vote. you cannot tell people that are in one town that they have got to go to another town to vote. first of all, many of them will not have transportation and you cannot
saw what we did what hurricane sandy. we can do this with the hurricane in the fiscal cliff coming if only we can get it up to a vote in the house. that may not happen and it may be that they cannot reach a deal on this plan because there is no procedural way to get a vote that would guarantee a few months down the road that you would actually need those targets. frankly finding a tax reform plan that raises a trillion dollars in revenue is far trickier than the 1986 tax reform that cut rates, broaden the base and eliminate the deduction but was revenue neutral, i was tough enough. but if they can manage to find that we may see that dynamic emerge let me make two other quick points. he was a loser and a winner on tuesday night. a winner because he won his house seat, a loser for the obvious reason but also for a couple of additional ones. it's kind of embarrassing when you are put on the ticket and you can't carry your own state. but also his percentage in his district went down significantly. at the same time, there was no question that paul ryan, who was a national figure but far
repeat the question. go ahead. >> [inaudible] >> the impact of hurricane sandy on the election; great question. >> well, our polling showed that there was an impact -- our final poll showed obama with 57% and romney with 47%. we had a dead tie a week earlier. so, the only intervening event at that time was sandy come and obama about 70% approval for his handling of the situation. a plurality of romney supporters also approved. i think in the end it was modest. i don't think it really ticked one way or the other. i think obama had been edging a little bit ahead even prior to the hurricane. i think the last two debates obviously not as important as the first. it never is. but, you know obama had not only stemmed the momentum following the first debate, but also i think had developed slightly a little bit of his own. i think in the end it probably helped him. certainly the atmospherics and the symbols of chris christi embracing him on a well-known republican helped him i think was on the margin pretty much. might have felt in the popular vote of northeast. we did see a big swing for obam
women and my wife jennifer, my mom, sandy, and my grandmother, kathryn who we call called the great one. and guess what? i have three daughters. one of my nine pink shirts. i want to thank ishmael reed and all of that before columbus foundation would have shown us the better angels of our nature. gratitude calls forth love in us. from shakespeare, love is not to merit the true minds of impediments. love is not love which alters when it alteration finds. or martin luther king jr., hate cannot cast out hate. only love can do that. from vincent van gogh, the greatest work of art is to love someone. from elizabeth barrett browning, how do i love you? let me count the ways. from the proverbs many bloggers cannot quench love. love is stronger than death. and from bell hooks, to return to love is to return to one another. i grew up in montana, and jonathan a member of the crow nation was the best basketball player in the state. he led a losing tradition the state spotlight tearing -- hearing the tama community on his shoulders all the way to the state tournament where he averaged 41 points a g
't realize i had until the tree fell on our house in sandy, my wife went to the attic to clear it out so the guys could put a new roof on, she said what are you saving this stuff for? [laughter] and i looked and i thought, this is what i'm saving it for. [laughter] and my number is 108, and, you know, i wasn't the lowest ranking person there. and so, you know, it was a room where good food was consumed as people have already mentioned, but there was a whole lot of staff on and on until 2:00 at night sometimes, and very little, you know, happening in the way of progress until much smaller group the eight people largely without staff met and speaker follow foley's officers. there was an agreement reached in which -- as pointed out the hurdle half way down the track and was a symbol of progress. that progress in part was the result of misjudgment, i think, on the part of some important players. here i would say senator byrd was convinced that the caps that were part of the agreement and insisted upon by dick weren't going to work. they were modest the first couple of years the view was. it
play ad big role in this election. shortening the convention in tampa and then sandy at the end probably did have an impact. i don't know that, it is easy to measure that impact but paul and i talked about, among the voters who decided at the last minute, voters who decided in the last seven days, barack obama actually won a majority, which was a huge surprise to political scientists around the country who will tell you where you have incumbent and challenger, the challenger picks up the majority of last-minnesotaers and so-called undecided voters because they're not happy with the status quo but they wait until the end to decide. in this case they actually broke for the incumbent. sandy probably had something to do with that. but look, i think, it's a matter of policy. it's a matter of outreach and having right people speaking for the republican party. finally it is a matter of tone. i think again making people feel that this is not just an inclusive party. forget the party. these policies are inclusive. the way to grow this economy and create more jobs an opportunity for every
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